Electric car: Wissing wants to increase the premium for electric cars from 6,000 to 10,800 euros

Business Wissing’s plan

The Minister of Transport wants to increase the premium for electric cars from 6,000 to 10,800 euros

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The coalition had actually planned to phase out subsidies for electric cars by 2025. Now Volker Wissing even wants to increase it significantly. According to an expert report, this could cost up to 73 billion euros.

BAccording to a report, German Transport Minister Volker Wissing (FDP) has had a billion euro increase in purchase bonuses for electric cars verified. The “Handelsblatt” (Monday edition) reported on a government report in which several research institutes evaluated the plan for an immediate climate protection programme. Accordingly, the FDP politician plans to extend the purchase premium for purely battery-electric vehicles or fuel cell cars until 2027.

According to the plans, anyone who buys a car with a maximum purchase price of 40,000 euros should receive a subsidy of 10,800 euros instead of the previous 6,000 euros. Added to this is the manufacturers’ subsidy of 3,000 euros, which they should also continue to grant until 2027. For more expensive vehicles up to 60,000 euros, the ministry provides a bonus of 8,400 euros instead of the 5,000 euros previously promised.

From the second half of 2023, buyers will need to scrap a combustion engine car that is at least eleven years old to qualify for full financing. According to the “Handelsblatt”, the value of the scrapping bonus could be around 1500 euros.

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Both premiums are to decrease from 2025 and, according to the report, cost “up to 73 billion euros”. Unlike Federal Economics Minister Robert Habeck (Greens), Wissing wants to continue promoting the purchase of plug-in hybrids until 2024 and not end it this year. He wants to halve the subsidy to 2250 or 1875 euros depending on the purchase price.

According to the coalition agreement, all purchase subsidies should actually expire in 2025. It is also agreed in the coalition agreement that the subsidy should continuously decrease until then. Thus, only 5.9 billion euros are provided for in the budget.

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